Peace Lutheran Church of Edgemont
Saturday, July 20, 2019
GOD'S WORK - OUR HANDS
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Tridumm (Trih-du-um) Continued

Good Friday   In this solemn celebration, we remember the Passion and Death of Our Lord. Traditionally worship is marked by several important rituals including the proclamation of the Passion, the Veneration of the Cross, an extended form of the prayers of Intercessions, and the veneration of the Cross. It seems strange that in the Good Friday liturgy we choose to venerate, or show reverence to, the very instrument that was used to crucify Jesus. The veneration of the Cross reminds us that through this Cross, we see the forgiveness of all people and the reconciliation of the world and God emerges. So, on Good Friday, we come forward to show our great reverence and respect for the Cross. 

It seems strange that in the Good Friday liturgy we choose to venerate, or show reverence to, the very instrument that was used to crucify Jesus. The veneration of the Cross reminds us that through this Cross, we see the forgiveness of all people and the reconciliation of the world and God emerges. So, on Good Friday, we come forward to show our great reverence and respect for the Cross. People have various traditions when they approach the Cross. Sometimes they kiss the Cross, kneel before the Cross, or even just touch it in some fashion. As you participate in this ritual, venerate the Cross in whatever way feels most normal. And most of all, just take in the experience of the gathered community coming so close to such a tragic, but integral, event in our faith.

 

The General Intercessions

If you enjoy spiritual aerobics, then this ritual is for you! In this expanded form of General Intercessions, the pastor and the congregation work together to pray 10 intercessions. These intercessions are the same intercessions the entire Church prays on Good Friday, and they include praying for the Holy Church, praying for the unity of all Christians, praying for the Jewish people, praying for people who do not believe in Christ or in God, praying for people in public office, and praying for people who are suffering or facing difficult times. These prayers recognize how universal our Church is and that we should be aware of all of the faiths and traditions in the world that are different from our own. While the petitions are the same everywhere because they are done in a “bidding” fashion meaning there is space for the worshipers to speak individually as the petitions are offered, they are also very contextual and personal as one might expect at a worship where the lost of a loved one is mourned.